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Bringing Up Furry Baby: Best Ways to Welcome a New Cat

Posted on 15 November, 2015 at 15:24 Comments comments (0)
Bringing up Furry Baby: Best Ways to Welcome a New Cat
               by Nancee Marin
                 Guest Writer
 
Surprisingly, cats are popular choices for pets, even more so than dogs, probably because of their independent, low-maintenance nature. However, for the uninitiated, cat care isn't exactly easy-peasy as cats have special needs, thanks to their quirky personality. Whether you're a first-time pet owner or a longtime pet parent bringing a kitty home for the first time, here are tips to make the transition much smoother for you and your feline friend.
Location, location, location!
 
Cats are particularly territorial creatures that crave stability and familiarity. Unknown surroundings are unsettling to them, so it's important to give them space and time to adjust to their new environment. This is where you get to play kitty real estate/home improvement expert!
 
Place essentials such as litter box, scratching post, adequate fresh water and quality food, eating and drinking bowls, and toys in a private, quiet room specifically assigned to your cat. Rooms with doors and tunnels are good places for cats to feel safe. You can use cat beds or cat carriers as their cozy cubbyholes.
 
Cats love to get high (other than their love of catnip!), so get a cat tree for their perching, observation, and resting station. It's also a great escape route should they need to get away for safety.
 
For maximum feline enjoyment, catification is the way to go. Who says that interior designing is only for humans?
Avoid CATastrophes
 
Ensure that your home is cat-proofed. Cats are too curious for their own good. They get into places and situations that can either hurt or kill them. Keep electrical cords, blind cords, harmful chemicals or substances, poisonous plants, and fragile items out of their reach. Keep small, tight, or cramped spaces shut. Be sure your cat doesn't get trapped there.
 
For the safety and well-being of your cat, keep him or her indoors to prevent exposure to diseases, attacks by other animals and humans, and motor vehicle accidents.
 
Schedule a vet check-up the same week you pick up your cat to make sure that he or she is in the clear.
Don't stand so close to me!
 
Cats are protective of their personal space. Don't make direct physical contact with them at first. Let them sniff your finger or paw at the feather wand or whatever cat toy you have on hand. Look away when you come close to them. When they see you, slowly blink at them. Blinking is the universal feline gesture. When the cat slowly blinks back at you, it's a sign that you've won him or her over.
 
Leave cats alone when they eat and when they do their business.
Chill out, cool cat!
 
Other than catnip, try Feliway spray or diffuser or Rescue Remedy by adding it to their food or water or rubbing it on their paws or ears to calm them down.
Slow and steady wins the race
 
Cats are private, reserved, and picky by nature. Too many sudden new changes and new stimuli overwhelm or even threaten them. Introduce them to other people and other pets gradually. It takes a while for them to warm up. Meet them on their terms. Wait until they're fully comfortable and confident. Don't force a cat to come out of hiding until he or she is ready. Let the cat investigate and approach first. The more you ignore cats, the faster they come to you as they feel more relaxed around you. Don't leave young children and other pets, especially dogs, unattended while being introduced to cats.
 
Get your cat accustomed to your smell and sight by staying in the same room with him or her for a period of time. Engage in low-key activities. Watch TV, read, write, talk to your cat, or groom your cat, then leave after you're done. Come back again after a while. Continue this pattern or routine until your cat appears to settle into his or her new living arrangement. 
 
When it comes to feeding, let your cat eat little by little if he or she doesn't eat much. This is normal behavior, although it's advised to call your vet if your cat ends up not eating for days.
 
With time, patience, and extra TLC, your cat may just stick around with you for the long haul. Here's to a wonderful start of a relationship that will hopefully last a lifetime—if not for nine lives!
 
Do you need a helping hand for taking care of those extra sets of paws? Kelly's Pet Sitting loves and understands cats. Please get in touch with us at 541-601-7461 or [email protected]. Your little Fluffy will thank you for it!
 
References and further reading
 
 
 
 
 
 
About the Author 
A self-avowed mad Renaissance woman, Nancee Marin stages collisions of the wild, wild worlds of the arts and letters, holistic health, and the pet industry as a musician, writer, editor, blogger, Reiki practitioner, and Mary Poppins to furry charges on her little cybercorner.
 
 
 
 

 

Kelly's Pet Sitting Reviews

Posted on 25 June, 2015 at 3:10 Comments comments (0)
REVIEWS of Kelly's Pet Sitting, Medford, OR

Our goal is to provide the very best pet care available and to give our clients peace of mind while they are away. We love getting positive reviews and our clients say it best. I would like to share with you a few of these reviews from some of our very satisfied clients.

8/6/2012

Kelly has taken care of my pets several times now. She is an amazing person who understands the needs of both the owner and their pets. I love the texting service of a daily update. When I return home my pets are happy and well taken care of. - Gigi M. Medford, OR 97501


2/10/2013

We have used Kelly's Pet Sitting Service several times now and we are very impressed with the level of quality and caring that she gives to our two dogs and our cat. We recommend her to anyone who is seeking the same. It should be noted that I rarely endorse someone, so, I admit that she has impressed us. - John M., Medford, OR 97501


10/2014

Thank you for the pictures. I also want to thank you for your great care of Cody and Maddie. We both commented after you left that we had never seen them so content and calm at the motel You truly have a gift with animals. If we are ever in a similar situation, you will be the first one we call. - Jacky O, Motel Client – Quality Inn, Medford 97504


10/7/2014

Thank you for being there. When I know you are coming over to check on our two fur-babies I don't worry when we are gone. Thank you again. - Laurie P., Medford, OR 97504


12/29/2014

I look forward to our ongoing “work” relationship It is such an important one, and will be for years to come, as we will utilize your services often! It is so nice to finally have someone reliable, personable, and trustworthy to watch our pets, and stay in our home, and not have to worry. You are a “Gem” for the work you do. - Patrick C., Jacksonville, OR 97530


3/30/15

Thanks so much! Such an amazing service you guys provide. Really appreciate it! - Danielle G, Medford 97501


This is just a sampling of the compliments we receive for our devoted care of pets. We are a small family owned business of experienced professional pet sitters and we are licensed, bonded, insured for your protection. If you would like to have the feeling of trust that comes from knowing your pet sitter has everything handled while you are away, give us a call to set up your complimentary “meet and greet”. 541-601-7461.


Dog Park Etiquette - Kelly's Pet Sitting Medford, OR

Posted on 28 May, 2015 at 1:45 Comments comments (0)
My dogs love going to the dog park to socialize and be off leash. Sometimes they want to play with other dogs or chase balls and other times they would rather just accompany me around the park as I walk or lay down and relax. Either way, we all get to unwind and enjoy ourselves.

Now that summer and warmer weather is here, a lot more people will be taking their dogs to the dog park to socialize and exercise. Here are eight tips for having a happy dog park experience.

Take a pre-park walk. With our busy schedules, we dog owners often use a trip to the dog park as a way to get all that excess energy out of our pups. That means the dogs coming in are at their peak level of energy. This may be the first real exercise they have gotten in hours, sometimes all day. You know this is what happened whenever you see a dog charge through the gate and head face first into trouble. The dog park should be used for socialization as well as mental and physical exercise, and to do that safely a pup needs to come in calm and relaxed. If your dog is unable to enter the park without having any self control, take a pre-park walk around a block or two.

Mind the gates. Many dog parks have at least two gates you have to go through before getting in our out of the main park area. One of the reasons for these gates is to keep unleashed dogs inside. No matter how eager your dog is to get inside and join the fun or to go home, make sure you enter and exit safely. You should only go into the “leashing and unleashing” area when there is no one, or no other dog inside. If someone is already in the process of going in our coming out, stop, step aside, and wait your turn. Always close and secure each gate behind you as you move through it. Just because your dog is ready to move on safely, that doesn't mean a dog on either side of the gate is ready to do the same.

Go leash-free. If a dog park is off-leash, you need to take the leash off your dog. Do so in that area between the two gates when there is no other dog around and you can make sure your dog is calm, cool, and collected before heading in to be with the masses. A dog on a leash, when all others are off, can cause trouble. A leashed dog is a magnet for other dogs to come check out and when that happens the poor pup on the leash can easily get scared because of his inability to react in the way the unleashed dogs do – the ability to get away if needed. This can be a recipe for a brawl.

Stay Calm. When a bunch of humans are put into one area with our furry babies, there can be differences of opinions and protectiveness of our pets. I've seen rational humans morph into insane lunatics in reaction to something or someone. Calm down, take a deep breath, and walk away – do anything that helps you NOT become “that guy.” When you put a bunch of dogs together and then add very opinionated owners, you are bound to have a scuffle now and then. As long as no one is hurt, pick yourselves up. shake it off, and move on. Dogs will react to the emotions of the humans around them, especially THEIR humans. When you go crazy, your dog is sure to follow, and that isn't good.

Follow the rules regarding age and keep kids close. Many dog parks prohibit children under a certain age from entering. Even if they are allowed, they need to be closely watched (as in stay right next to them). Just because your dog is good with your kid, that doesn't mean other dogs will be. Letting a child be unsupervised around unfamiliar dogs, who are just being dogs in a park designated for their kind, is unfair and unsafe for both species.

Keep the party small. Be aware of any rules you dog park has limiting the number of dogs one person can bring. Even if there isn't a rule, only take as many dogs as you can watch at once, and reasonably control if things get out of hand.

Leave human food at home. DO NOT bring human food into a dog park – EVER! You are just asking for trouble. And it's also a good idea to leave the dog treats at home too. If other dogs smell the food or dog treats, they may be food-possessive, and this can trigger a fight.

Let the dogs teach each other. The best thing that can happen to a puppy at a dog park is to learn manners from their elders. Puppies may not heed another dog's “get back” warnings and may find themselves being disciplined for their bad behavior. They may yelp, but they are being taught a lesson. If this happens to your puppy, do a quick check to make sure he is ok, but let him walk it off and absorb the lesson. He will be better off when he learns common courtesy. If you tend to be overprotective of your pooch and don't let dog lessons happen, you may be inadvertently teaching your pup to be afraid of other dogs and react negatively. Which is the exact opposite of why you are going to the dog park in the first place.


Do you have any tips for the dog park? Share them in the comments below. 

Kelly's Pet Sitting in Medford, OR can help keep your dog happy during the day by providing daily dog walks while you are at work or on vacation.  We also provide play time which can mentally and physically satisfy your dog's need for stimulation and interaction to help prevent destructive behaviors. 

How Your Pet Sitter Can Help Train Your Puppy

Posted on 19 April, 2015 at 18:41 Comments comments (0)
How Your Pet Sitter Can Help Train Your Puppy



Having a new puppy is such an exciting time! They are so adorable, playful, and well, just FUN.

FACT: Puppies require a LOT of time. A new puppy's needs can be overwhelming and most pet parents have jobs to go to or other responsibilities and just don't have that kind of time in their day; so let the professionals do it for you.

That's where Kelly's Pet Sitting comes in. Our experienced pet sitters understand that your pup needs to stay on schedule in order to have success at potty training and to begin experiencing life in a positive way.

Crate Training

If you are crate training, the rule of thumb is 1 hour in the crate for every 1 month of age. So if you have a 3 month pup, you can only expect him to hold it for 3 hours between potty breaks. We love nothing better than to take them outside, praise them for doing their business and help them understand that their crate is a safe place to hang out. As they grow, their time in the crate can be increased.

As your pup grows, we can work with you if you would like to have an area of your home gated off to contain the pup until we know they are reliable in their potty training. Having a potty trained dog makes everyone's life easier!

Manners/Training

We will work with you while you are training your pup basic commands and manners which is a vital part of raising a puppy to be a polite member of your family. We will discuss with you which words you want to use with your pup to keep it consistent and reinforce these basic commands in a positive way.

Exercise

Young dogs have a tremendous amount of energy! They need time to run and play, chew and receive love and cuddles. We believe that puppies (and all dogs) need a healthy outlet for all of that energy so they don't turn to destructive behaviors in order to entertain themselves. A tired dog is a happy dog!

So, if you have a new puppy that you would like some help with, or even an adult dog who could really use some attention, love and exercise during the day, please contact Kelly's Pet Sitting in Medford, Oregon. We LOVE pets and want to help you to have a happy pet while also fulfilling your daily obligations. Our pet sitters are bonded, insured and background checked for your peace of mind.

Call us today at 541-601-7461 or visit our website: www.kellyspetsitting.net.


Did You Know These Fascinating Pet Facts?

Posted on 14 February, 2015 at 1:26 Comments comments (0)
DID YOU KNOW?

As a professional pet sitter for 10 years and a pet owner for 40+ years, I am always fascinated about anything to do with animal information. Even though I have a lot of pet care experience, I am constantly learning more all the time. I know that my education about pets is an ongoing experience and I welcome any new knowledge that will help me with my cat sitting, dog sitting, and also passing along this information to pet owners.

Discover how much you really know about our canine and feline companions.

    Felines are very neat drinkers – they take about 4 laps per second, or 5 teaspoons in a minute.

     The world's first dog show was held in Britain in 1859; the first cat      show in 1871.

     Each cat's nose is uniquely ridged – much like a fingerprint on a human.

    A running dog averages 19 mph, while greyhounds can move at a 45 mph clip.

    A cat can move at 30 mph, with the cheetah holding the record at 75 mph.

    62% of American households have a pet. That's more than 70 million homes!

    Humans have 5 million smell-detecting cells, while dogs have more than 220 million.

    Cats can jump seven times their own height.

    Dogs do dream? Yes, they experience REM sleep, complete with paw twitching and movement.

    A group of cats is called a clowder.

    Dogs don't feel guilt. They may look like it, but they're really reacting to your displeasure.

    Cats have 5 toes on their front paws, but only 4 on each back paw.

    Contrary to popular belief, dogs can see colors, but in less vivid hues.

    Cats have been domesticated about half as long as dogs.

    Many dogs can understand up to 250 words and gestures.

    A cat can spend up to 30% of its life grooming itself.

    The name Fido comes from Latin and means “fidelity.”

    The most popular male dog names are Max and Jake; the top female names are Maggie and Molly.

    10% of a cat's bones are in its tail, and the tail helps them keep balanced.

    The noisiest dogs are Beagles and Collies, and the quietest is the Basenji (they an't bark at all).

    Cats have two vocal chords and can make about 100 vocal sounds, while dogs make only about 10.

    *Source: FM mymagazine 2015

    At Kelly's Pet Sitting, we are dedicated to providing the very best pet care for your pets. And that means that we are always educating ourselves about pet care, behavior, nutrition, etc  Whatever type of pet sitting you are looking for: cat sitting, dog sitting, dog walking, or other types of pet care, we are ready to serve your needs. 

Please feel free to share any comments, useful articles and/or personal experience on our blog or Facebook Page. We consider what we do as an ongoing learning experience and the more we know and the better prepared we are, the more we can help our precious pets live their best lives!

Why Does My Cat Do That?

Posted on 4 February, 2015 at 3:10 Comments comments (0)
WHY DOES MY CAT DO THAT?

I have been studying Pet Sitter's International Certification Program Coursework to further my education in the areas of pet care, health, behaviors, etc. in order to be the best pet sitter I can possibly be. I wanted to share some of the information I am learning with pet owners, particularly CAT owners in this blog.

Cats are not fond of change, so pet sitting is the best option by far for taking care of a cat while the owner is away. But there are still issues with cats that pet sitters need to recognize, know what's behind the behaviors and how to deal with them.

Our cat companions can be a real challenge at times. Sometimes we just don't understand why our cats are acting strange, or being destructive. As a professional pet sitter, I know that sometimes cats can act differently for a pet sitter than they do with their pet parents. And, I am also owned by 3 cats myself, so I know how perplexing cat behavior can be.

Here are some possible explanations for “WHY do they do it?”



A good example of that is going outside of the litterbox. The cat may have had a sub-clinical medical problem and when you add any sort of stress, it goes over the edge. That's why a problem seems to appear suddenly – out of the blue. An experienced pet sitter can alert you to any changes in litterbox habits that may indicate a health concern that would warrant a check up by your veterinarian.



Some cats you sit for, you may never see. You peek under the bed and there they are! With a cat like that, you don't want to reach in and try to haul it out Believe what it's telling you. If it's looking for a fight, leave it alone. Make sure your pet sitter is experienced in cat behavior in order to make your feline feel relaxed and comfortable while you are away. I find that almost every cat I have cared for comes out eventually to see me, even if I have been told “I will probably never see the cat.”



You've got to give a cat an opportunity to be a cat or it will act out. Cats are predatory, playful, territorial. Providing a cat with the attention it needs, whether it be petting, lap time, chasing after toys or laser lights, are all easy outlets for you to provide for your feline friend. Cats need daily interaction with their humans. For social and active kitties you may want to have your sitter visit two times a day.



A lot of people get injured by introducing a cat to a dog by holding it out and saying, “Kitty, meet Doggy.” You are the nearest vertical object and that cat wants to get away and high up to safety. At this point, you simply become an obstacle to go over or through. If you try to handle the cat, you'll get bit or scratched. Cat scratches or bites can be very serious – always seek medical attention. Also, it is best to let your cat be the one to initiate contact with a new person in your home at their own comfort level.



Cats are the best blackmail artists in the world. They will meow and meow and they won't give up! They know they'll eventually get the attention they want. A dog will ask for a while, then go away. Not a cat. See if you can figure out what your kitty is asking for. Is it affection? Play time? Wanting to be petted? Note: Sometimes they are just beggars for more treats or food. Be sure you are feeding them a nutritious diet and the proper amount to keep kitty at a healthy weight. But, a couple treats never hurt, right?



Destructive scratching is usually territory marking, exercise or claw sharpening. Be sure you have several scratching posts available for your kitty. Kittens need to be taught where it is appropriate to scratch. I sprinkle cat nip on the areas I want kitty to scratch and I provide vertical and horizontal scratching opportunities in various locations throughout my home.



Cats need a place to “do their business” that is private and away from their feeding areas. The general rule is one litter box per cat, plus one extra if you have multiple cats. They should be placed in different areas of the house and cleaned daily. If you need to change the type of litter you use, it should be done gradually. Cats do not usually like change and may go outside the box when there are sudden changes.


THE “FELINE TOOL BOX”

There are some things that I have found useful in my profession as a cat sitter, as well as sharing my own home with cats.

  1. Feliway. This is a product that uses the facial pheromones of cats to relieve stress and help prevent unwanted behaviors. It seems to help upset cats to become calm. It comes in a spray or a plug-in. I use the spray on my clothes when meeting cats that may be fearful of new people. You can also spray it in their room (never spray on the cat.) The plug-in works well in a room where the cats hang out and are in a stressful condition, such as moving to a new location, fireworks or thunderstorms, pet parent leaving for a trip, etc.

  1. Aluminum Foil. Cats do not like it! You can tape it on an area that you don't want a cat to scratch. Or if a cat is spraying a certain area, put up a sheet of foil there.

  1. Plastic Carpet Runners. This is the type that has the bumps on the back. Turn it upside down. Cats don't like the way that feels and you can use it to keep them off of things or out of certain areas.
  1. Double Sided Tape. If your cat is scratching your furniture or getting up on counters, you might want to try this (or one of the other suggestions).

  1. Spray Bottle. I have found that this works well to stop unwanted behavior – like a cat getting up on counter tops. But when you use it, don't say anything or they will simply relate the negative consequence to your presence. Be sure to reward your cat with treats or praise when doing the behavior you want, like using their scratching post or staying off of the counters.




The Dangers of Antifreeze

Posted on 5 January, 2015 at 18:54 Comments comments (0)

The Dangers of Antifreeze

My blog this month is a post by Dr. Jeff Grognet and Mike Annan at ACE Academy for Canine Educators. Antifreeze is so deadly that I wanted to highlight the importance of keeping it out of reach from your pets. Without immediate veterinary treatment the prognosis for recovery is very grim. Dogs and cats are very curious by nature so I felt this was extemely important to share. 
 
Ethylene glycol, the most common type of antifreeze commercially available, has an extremely sweet taste. This means that pets, wildlife, and even children are attracted to it. Unfortunately, ethylene glycol (EG) is also very toxic. Once it is absorbed through the intestinal lining, it is metabolized in the body to a chemical called oxalate. In the blood, oxalate causes little harm, but when it concentrates in the kidney tubules, it forms microscopic crystals. These crystals plug the tubules, block urine flow and shut down urine production. With nowhere to go, toxins build up in the bloodstream and poison the pet. When EG is first consumed, the animal suffers from vomiting and delirium but, in many cases, owners do not notice these symptoms. Over the next few days as kidney function deteriorates, drinking increases significantly. Once toxins reach a toxic level, which is normally three to four days after EG consumption, appetite falls and the legs become weak. Over time (a few more days), the toxins cause extreme lethargy and dullness. Pets can then slip into a coma or begin convulsing. Death soon follows. Treatment, once signs are evident, is considered futile. The kidneys are already damaged beyond repair. The only ones that recover from EG toxicity are ones that are caught consuming EG and treated immediately. If therapy begins within an hour of consumption, the conversion of EG to oxalate can be inhibited and the poisoning averted. The treatment for EG poisoning is administration of ethyl alcohol (the one you drink) intravenously. The high level of ethyl alcohol in the blood saturates the enzyme that converts EG to oxalate and stops oxalate from being created. The EG is eliminated from the body and causes no harm. Alcohol intoxication must be continued for 48 hours. Because EG poisoning is so deadly, it’s not surprising it is the number one cause of fatalities in dogs and cats. It is also an issue with children who may find the bright, often yellow container attractive and consume it. This has led to pressure from both veterinarians and animal welfare groups against antifreeze manufacturers and government for change. Years ago, and even now, groups promote the use of the non-toxic antifreeze propylene glycol instead of EG. Labeled as “pet-safe”, propylene glycol is slightly more expensive than EG, bit it is a great way to protect dogs. You can ask your mechanic to add this instead of the traditional antifreeze on the next radiator fill up. The other way to protect pets is to make EG unpalatable. This is done by adding a bittering agent. British Columbia was the first province to enact laws protecting dogs from this toxic antifreeze. Legislation took effect January 1,2011 and it makes it mandatory to add an extremely bitter substance to antifreeze and engine coolant. But, this only affects EG sold at the retail level in BC. Though the bittering agent will lessen the appeal of EG to pets, it does not eliminate its toxicity. You still need to be careful when handling or disposing of any antifreeze product. And, a loophole is that mechanics aren’t required to use the safe antifreeze because they aren’t selling it. So, make sure you know what is added to your radiator.


Dr. Jeff Grognet and Mike Annan
ACE Academy for Canine Educators
[email protected]

Keeping Kitty Safe at Christmas

Posted on 20 December, 2014 at 3:24 Comments comments (0)
The Holidays are just around the corner. Time for family traditions: Christmas Trees, Dinners, Gift Giving, Celebrating.

But if you have cats it is best to know some ways to keep your cats out of harms way.

Many families enjoy having a Christmas Tree in their home, but often this is a cause for concern for pet owners. Cats may see the ornaments and lights as fantastic cat toys and the tree is for climbing, right? And cats are very curious by nature.

Here are some tips to help keep kitty safe around the Christmas tree.

  1. Wrap aluminum foil around the trunk. This will help discourage climbing since cats don't like the the feel of it.
  1. Remove the lower branches. This serves many purposes. Cats are very good climbers and this may make it harder for your cat to climb the tree. This will also eliminate the lower hanging ornaments that will tempt kitty to play with.

  1. Do not use tinsel on your tree. To a cat, tinsel looks like a shiny string to play with but is very dangerous if your cat were to ingest it. This can cause serious injury to your cat resulting in expensive veterinary bills, or worse.
  2. Watch the electrical cords. Chewing the cords can cause serious harm to your pet. You can tape the cords to the wall to prevent chewing but it is always best to unplug cords if you are not there to supervise your pets.   

5 REASONS WHY PET OWNERS ARE CALLING KELLY'S PET SITTING

Posted on 11 November, 2014 at 23:57 Comments comments (1)
5 REASONS WHY PET OWNERS ARE CALLING KELLY'S PET SITTING
Written by Kelly Hall, Owner of Kelly's Pet Sitting, LLC

Our business has been growing steadily in the 10 years we have been providing pet care to Medford, Oregon area clients. So we have to ask, Why are pet owners calling Kelly's Pet Sitting for their dog and cat sitting needs, instead of another professional pet sitter in our area?

WORD OF MOUTH: Many of our new clients come to us because one of our existing clients referred us to them. We feel this is the greatest compliment of all when we hear the wonderful things our clients have to say about us and that they want their friends, family and co-workers to receive the same great care that they have experienced.

PEACE OF MIND: I have clients tell me that Kelly's Pet Sitting gives them the Peace Of Mind that they have been looking for. What creates this Peace of Mind? Several things: Trust, Reliability, Knowledge of Pet Care, Behavior, Health, etc. Some have tried boarding their dogs in kennels and their pets returned to them stressed out or sick with kennel cough. Others have used friends, neighbors or family in the past and were not satisfied with the care their pets received (or even worse, no one showed up!). Others tell me, they are tired of imposing on friends or family (even if they do a great job) but even well-meaning friends or family sometimes forget, or make other plans, after saying they would sit for you. Not surprising that people have a life of their own, is it? That is why you hire a professional pet sitter who does this for a living!

At Kelly's Pet Sitting, your pets are are #1 priority. You schedule with us and you no longer have to worry about your pet's care. We will be there EVERY time as promised, giving your pets the top quality care and attention they deserve. We also keep in touch with you while you are gone. You can receive a daily text from your pet sitter, photos, etc. to let you know everything is going fine at home.

ONLY THE MOST QUALIFIED PET SITTERS:  Our clients love that we can offer flexibility in scheduling for our client's convenience. We are a small family owned business, not a large pet sitting company that feels like a chain store! Besides Kelly, the owner, who pet sits and manages the business, we have a couple of wonderful pet sitters on staff. Our pet sitters are: bonded, insured, experienced, back ground checked, and of course, true animal lovers. The only sitters I have on my staff are the ones that I feel completely comfortable having the sitter in MY home, caring for MY precious pets. Having more than 1 sitter enables us to back up one another in case of injury or illness, busy times, and allow the sitter time off to spend time with family and friends (very important!). No one can work 7 days per week/365 days per year (believe me I have tried), yet we are able to offer pet sitting services to you and your pets throughout the year!

AVAILABILITY: Because we do this on a full time basis (and how we make our living) we have more availability. Some “pet sitters” do this on the side and have to work around their school or work schedule which may not be convenient for you and your schedule. When they can't accommodate you, you are back to square one, wondering who will care for your pets.

GREAT CLIENT REVIEWS: You can also check out our online reviews.

YELP – 5 Star Reviews here: Reviews: http://www.yelp.com/biz/kellys-pet-sitting-medford


ANGIE'S LIST: we have had some great reviews on Angie's List, but unfortunately they require more PAID Members for them to show up :(


Once clients have used our pet sitting services they are excited to tell other pet owners they know about us, so that they too can enjoy stress-free vacations or work days, knowing that their pets have the excellent care they deserve.

Whether you need dog sitting, a cat sitter, or any other type of pet care, we do that! We offer daily visits, overnights or dog walking while on vacation or at work. Kelly's Pet Sitting in Medford, OR is here to help!

SO WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR? 

Visit our website for more information: www.kellyspetsitting.net 

CONTACT US: E-MAIL: [email protected] or
PHONE: Call us today at 541-601-7461 to discuss your pet care needs and to set up your complimentary “Meet and Greet” to meet you and your pets at your home. You'll be happy you did and your pets will be too!

How to Help Your Senior Pet

Posted on 9 September, 2014 at 3:17 Comments comments (0)
SENIOR PET CARE TIPS

Taking care of a senior pet can be difficult, but there are many things you can do to make the process a manageable one. Below are a few preventative tips to help manage the aging process.

Good nutrition is critical to good health at all ages, so be sure your pet is on a proper diet. Check with your veterinarian for a healthy meal program that suits your pet's needs.

Other steps a pet owner can take to delay the onset of aging in their pets include:teeth cleaning to prevent gum disease; grooming to keep the skin and coat healthy and to be aware of any problems such as dry skin, thin or brittle coat, thin coat, body odor, or sore spots; and checking the ears for odor or gunk produced by infecting organisms.

The first sign of aging is a general decrease in activity level, including lethargy, a tendency to sleep longer, a waning of enthusiasm for long walks and fun activities such as catch. These symptoms could also be indicative of an illness and may warrant a trip to the veterinarian.

Hearing loss is a common consequence of aging, as is some deterioration of sight.
As aging advances, heart, liver, and kidneys lose their efficiency, and the immune system is less able to fight off attacks by bacteria and viruses. Bladder control may be affected, and muscles decrease in size and function.

Tips to keep your pet comfortable

Check your pet for fleas and ticks. Fleas can carry tapeworms and cause allergies; ticks can carry Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and Lyme Disease. Older pets are more prone to these diseases since they have a decreased ability to fight off parasites.

Reduce calorie intake, if necessary, to prevent your pet from becoming overweight. Ask your veterinarian about a special diet if your pet needs to lose weight.

Use a baby gate to keep your pet away from the stairs or carpeted areas to avoid bathroom accidents and/or injury.

Most importantly, be aware of your pet's increased special requirements as an aging animal. Your pet may not remember to go to the bathroom outside or to eat, so you may need to remind them. And above all, be patient. With these simple tips, your pet may live years longer and better enjoy his/her time with the family.

Kelly's Pet Sitting has experienced pet sitters that know how to care for senior pets and what to look for if your pet has any changes in behavior or health that require attention.

Call us today for all of your pet sitting needs: 541-601-7461 or fill out the Request for Service Form on our website: kellyspetsitting.net. 



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